To Land’s End

We make one more ride down Revolucion de 1910 in La Paz, stopping at the neveria for horchata, the panaderia for sweet treats and the grocery for avacados. Bellies and bags full, we climb up and away from town.

The pavement takes us to La Ventana. It turns out kite boarding is a thing here. It’s almost like the balloon festival, but with kites captained by Canadians. The tide is low and we ride the beach, dodging strings and beginners.

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Weather is blowing in and we find a quiet, empty space to sleep in the dunes.

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Past San Juan de Los Planes the pavement runs out. We share the dirt road with four kids in a side by side, cruising up and down, up and down.

Soon, we go up. The grades in Mexico have been steep and this road is no different. I look down at the paved road, cars and resort below us and breathe a little easier. It’s just us and the cows again.

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The road descends through a wash alive with butterflies and then climbs a bit more to the cliffs along the coast. I sit back and hold on. The downhills are just as challenging as the uphills.

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At the end, an empty beach with our name on it.

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As the sun is setting, Javier and Gonzalo ride by. We met them on the road out of La Paz. They are from Mexico City and have a week or so to ride from there to Cabo Pulmo. They join us at our camp spot and we learn more about Mexico.

The road takes us along the coast. We dip in and out of tourist towns long enough to fill up on food and water. We sleep on quiet beaches. We see birds flock after bait balls in the sea, and watch manta rays wing by in the water. Whale tales splash on the horizon. The desert is even green here.

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We walk along the coast near Cabo Pulmo and see this. I don’t understand what’s happening. Maybe a geologist or oceanographer can help me out? It’s like mother nature dumped a load of perfectly round sea stones and left them.

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We follow the road to San Jose, and the doorstep of an old friend.

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11 thoughts on “To Land’s End

  1. Oh yeahhhhh! LOVE getting updates! Your writing is fantastic and reminds me of letters my father and I would write, back and forth, when he lived on his sail boat. Such a joy to read! Happy you are back /w the cows…would definitely be my preference :). I have experienced a butterfly migration, in Mexico before..but, it was farther north, by Palenque. Beatiful and seemed odd. Those rocks!!?? Glad you put the second pic in…had no idea they were soooo HUGE! Interested to hear what the rock hounds have to say about it.
    The weather coming in was beautiful!
    Be careful on those down hill……lol
    Love you guys! Thank you for sharing. HAPPY NEW YEAR!! 2016

    Like

  2. Elizabeth,

    I tried to post the following in the comment section of your Pedaling Perspectives note, but I am not sure it actually got posted, so I am repeating it here. Thanks for the notes and photos…it enable us armchair riders to share in your adventure.

    With regard to the round rocks at the shore….the rolling action of the surf abrades the parts of the rock that stick out more than they do more protected parts. Therefore the projecting parts wear down faster and the rock becomes rounder and rounder the longer it stays in the surf zone. Many kinds of rocks have bedding planes or other planes of weakness along which they fracture, and thus they never achieve the rounded look. Your rocks must be more massive;;;;perhaps granite…I can’t tell from the pictures.

    Jim Mello Rixeyville….just a few miles from your in-laws

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hmmm…these rocks were above the normal surf zone, and the round ones were a different type of rock, and also quite large – probably two to four feet in diameter. I do think your idea is part of the explanation though. Thanks!

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